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ERIC Number: ED262856
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1985
Pages: 92
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Relationship of Motivational Differences of Male and Female Community College Students to Academic Achievement.
Martin, Donna M.
A study was conducted at a mid-western community college to determine motivational profile differences between high and low achievers. The study population of 71 full-time, degree-seeking students in the school of arts and sciences was divided into a high achieving group with grade point averages (GPA's) of 3.85 and above, and a low achieving group with GPA's of 1.0 or below; and was tested using Martin's Motivational Profile. Study results included the following: (1) positive motivational sources, such as pleasure with performance, happiness, and good prior performance, had no significant impact on academic performance; (2) low achieving males scored highest in overall positive motivational sources, while low achieving females scored lowest; (3) females in both high and low achieving groups had significantly higher negative motivation scores than males; (4) among both male and female low achievers, negative motivation was almost twice that of the high achievers; (5) overall energy levels were significantly higher in low achievers than in high achievers; (6) the group with the lowest depression level was the high achieving males and the group with the highest depression level was the low achieving males; (7) anxiety levels were significantly higher in low achievers; (8) women in both groups manifested a significantly greater level of fear than males; (9) negative conflict scores were significantly higher in low achievers; and (10) frustration levels were significantly higher in low achievers. The study report includes the motivational profile instrument as well as raw data and ANOVA tables for the motivation factors. (LAL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires; Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A