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ERIC Number: ED262717
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Aug
Pages: 352
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Non-Credit Instructional Activities, July 1, 1984 Through December 31, 1984 with Trend Information for 1983 and 1984. State University of New York. Office of Institutional Research Report No. 20-85.
State Univ. of New York, Albany. Office of Institutional Research and Analytical Studies.
Information on non-credit instructional activities at the State University of New York (SUNY) is presented, based on the biannual Survey of Noncredit Instructional Activities for July 1, 1984-December 31, 1984. These noncredit instructional activities require registration of participants and have a range of formats (e.g., courses, workshops, seminars, conferences, institutes). These activities are typically organized and administered by offices of continuing education, community service, adult education, innovative studies, and extension services. However, they may be organized and administered by any other division, school, or academic department. Included are summary reports of the number of noncredit activities and registrations by six categories: subject area, target clientele, organizing unit, instructional type, faculty status, and funding source. In addition, trend reports summarize the number of noncredit activities and registrations for four successive SUNY academic terms in 1983 and 1984. All noncredit courses offered at SUNY institutions are also listed by subject area. Noncredit course system definitions are included, along with an explanation of codes used in the survey. (SW)
State University of New York, Office of Institutional Research, Albany, NY 12246.
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: State Univ. of New York, Albany. Office of Institutional Research and Analytical Studies.
Note: Charts summarizing the contents of noncredit course system reports may not reproduce well.