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ERIC Number: ED261316
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Aug
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Issues in the Training of Minority Psychologists.
Bernal, Martha E.
A survey of minority curricula and training in accredited clinical psychology programs (1982) revealed that a multicultural approach to training was poorly represented. Multicultural training seeks to understand people of different groups based on their cultures and experiences over time, not in comparison to the dominant culture. A multicultural training program would be based on the recognition that our society is multicultural and that psychology training programs should be committed to all groups within society. In addition, it must be recognized that multicultural training requires competence and is equal in importance to all other areas of learning emphasized in the training of psychologists. Trainees in multicultural programs which recognize and follow these two principles should develop: (1) a broad-based understanding of the social, historical, and cultural background and characteristics of minorities; (2) positive attitudes toward all groups; (3) theoretical knowledge and expertise in the scientific study of sociocultural variables as behavioral determinants; (4) knowledge and experience in the application, development, and evaluation of culturally appropriate interventions; (5) the ability to communicate in the client's own language; and (6) appreciation that the ethics of research and practice of psychology apply to all groups. Resources available for such training include courses, research experience, and supervised practica. To be successful, a multicultural training program requires a full commitment to the integration of multicultural training at all levels of instruction. (NRB)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented in the symposium, "The Professional Training of Minority Psychologists: Paradigms and Perspectives," at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (93rd, Los Angeles, CA, August 23-27, 1985).