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ERIC Number: ED259147
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Mar
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Doubt, Struggle and Growth: A Profile of the Mature Woman in the Student Role.
Patterson, Carey D.; Blank, Thomas O.
This study was conducted to develop a profile of the mature woman who seeks a postsecondary education, to ascertain the personal and social reasons that influence an adult woman to return to school, and to describe the interpersonal adjustments that accompany this change in life-style. Data were collected via a 50-item fixed-response questionnaire that was completed by 151 older female students at two colleges (Cedar Crest Woman's College and Lehigh County Community College). In addition, relatives of two-thirds of the respondents completed the forms. The results of the study showed that the students responding were white (97 percent) and have had some previous college experience. The ages of the respondents ranged from 22 to 65 with the median category 30-34 years old. Sixty percent of the students were married, the majority of their husbands had college degrees, and the families were relatively affluent. Almost two-thirds of the women had children (four for older women, two for younger women). More than half of the respondents were employed. All of the participants viewed their education as a self-enriching, self-initiated experience for which they had long-term personal or professional goals. Most had superior academic performances. Based on the data obtained in this study, it was concluded that the major problem areas for these students were exam anxiety, time allotment, and role conflict. The women in this study struggled with doubts and overcame obstacles to continue their personal growth. (KC)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research; Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association (Boston, MA, March 1985). Summary of a Master's Thesis, Lehigh University.