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ERIC Number: ED258272
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Sex and Power in the Office: An Overview of Gender and Executive Power Perceptions in Organizations.
Winsor, Jerry L.
An examination of recent literature concerning differing male and female socializations reveals a number of implications and suggestions for changing some negative executive attitudes regarding female executive skills. While more women are in executive positions than ever before, women are still at a disadvantage because the productive interpersonal skills that are part of their socialization are not highly valued in the workplace, and they need additional safeguards against sexual harassment. Specific suggestions for remedies to problems of inappropriate power perceptions in organizations include the following: (1) training programs with the goal of consciousness raising (awareness) of the problems of power perceptions in the specific organizations; (2) employment analysis of firms' hiring, placement, and advancement policies focusing upon comparative worth data for each management and executive position; (3) intentional mentoring programs by the organization and networking efforts by male and female manager/executive candidates; (4) having intermediate range divisional goals to increase the number of managerial/executive women integrated into the organization and periodic reviews of the target objectives; and (5) skills training for all manager/executive career development personnel in the organization focusing upon skills shown to relate to effective human relations and conflict management. (EL)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: In: Professional Communication in the Modern World: Proceedings of the Southeast Convention of the American Business Communication Association (31st, Hammond, LA, April 5-7, 1984).