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ERIC Number: ED148956
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977
Pages: 215
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Toward a New Bill of Rights.
National Urban League, Inc., New York, NY.
The theme of the 1976 Urban League Conference was "a new bill of rights" for all Americans. Rights of blacks and other minority groups were particularly emphasized. The subject of the right to black representation in the American political system was addressed by Samuel Du Bois Cook. The keynote address by Vernon E. Jordan, Jr. considered such issues as the rights of all citizens to education, economic security, health, family stability, political representation, and the right to safe communities. Andrew Billingsley, James G. Haughton, Andrew F. Brimmer, Edythe J. Gaines, and Thomas A. Bradley all spoke to at least one of these issues. Carla Hill's address reviewed the progress of federal urban programs in the year preceding the Conference. Henry Kissinger spoke about foreign affairs, particularly the U.S. relationship with Africa. W.J. Usery, Jr. and William M. Ellinghaus stressed black participation in the American private enterprise system. Yvonne Braithwaite Burke, Arthur A. Fletcher, Hubert H. Humphrey, and Charles McC. Mathias discussed the role of black voters in the 1976 presidential race. John Hope Franklin mentioned important events in the history of black Americans. The introductions, texts, and discussions of all the above mentioned speeches are included in this document. Also included are texts of press conferences held, statements of concern released by the Urban League, lists of Conference exhibitors, and a listing of League members and Conference participants. (GC)
Publication Type: Collected Works - Proceedings
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Urban League, Inc., New York, NY.
Note: Proceedings of the National Urban League Conference (Boston, Massachusetts, August 1-4, 1976) ; Parts of document may be marginally legible due to print quality