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ERIC Number: ED144932
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1976
Pages: 34
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Maximizing the Effective Use of School Time by Teachers and Students.
Wang, Margaret C.
This study, conducted with second grade pupils of an inner city public elementary school, sought to investigate the extent to which an instructional-learning system can be effective in reducing time needed for learning while increasing the time spent on learning by the student. For this study, the individualized instruction program in a developmental school for the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) of the University of Pittsburgh was altered from a prescribed time-block instructional system to a pupil self-schedule system, with no specific time block designated for tasks in any given subject area. It was hypothesized that, given the responsibility for scheduling their own activities, pupils would complete more tasks in less time and would exhibit more on-task behaviors while completing the task. Analysis of data collected from (1) observation of student and teacher classroom behavior, (2) measures of student task performance, (3) measures of self responsibility, and (4) measures of time, supported the hypotheses in that pupils under the self-schedule system completed more tasks in less time, and exhibited more on-task behavior. They also had fewer management and more instructional interaction with teachers. Other independent variables, falling under "time spent" and "time needed" categories were also investigated. Appendices include a discussion of the LRDC Individualized Instructional Program, and the format of a pupil schedule sheet for aiding the student in planning and tracking learning tasks to be completed. (MJB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Pittsburgh Univ., PA. Learning Research and Development Center.