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ERIC Number: ED143747
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-May
Pages: 91
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Race and Sex Effects on Access to College. Report No. 229.
Thomas, Gail E.
This study evaluates the effectiveness of an educational attainment model in predicting the likelihood of college attendance of a recent sample of black and white male and female high school seniors. These students were participants in a 1970 National Longitudinal study sponsored by the National Center for Educational Statistics. Specific variables that were measured in the study include: 1) family status origin, 2) mental ability, 3) senior class rank, 4) high school curriculum, 5) significant others influences, 6) perceived college ability, 7) educational expectations, and 8) college attendance. Three major observations were derived from the study. First, race differences were observed to be more influential than sex differences in affecting college attendance. Second, sex differences in educational attainment among blacks which have not been previously examined, were less pronounced than sex differences among whites. Third, many of the direct effects of race and sex on college attendance were found to be mediated by educational expectations, school process variables (class rank and curriculum placement) and to a lesser extent significant others' influences. This was also true of the direct effects of socioeconomic status (SES) and mental ability on college attendance operating for the race-by-sex groups examined. Black males were somewhat of an exception in that family origin maintained a model impact on their chances of college attendance but not on the influence of expectations, school process variables and significant others' influences. (Author/AM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. Center for the Study of Social Organization of Schools.
Note: For a related document see UD 017 099