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ERIC Number: ED139724
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Improving Reading Skills in Social Studies. How To Do It Series, Series 2, No. 1.
Mahoney, Joseph E.
Some practical ways to improve reading skills in social studies classes without sacrificing content objectives and goals are presented. It is emphasized that social studies teachers are best suited to teach reading skills in their own subject field. Social studies teachers need to focus on three reading skills: vocabulary development and word recognition skills, comprehension skills, and study skills. To make a conscious effort to help students improve reading skills, several methods are suggested for gaining an information base about students reading ability. These include use of standardized tests of reading ability; informal surveys of students' reading habits; and content inventory consisting of reading passages followed by questions about the main ideas, inference, and details. The cloze technique, in which students fill in blanks in a reading passage, indicates student understanding of the central idea as well as vocabulary development. Students' reading gaps can be determined by comparing their reading ability with textbook readability based on the Fry scale. Effective teaching techniques to improve content reading are discussed. These include purposeful reading directed by teachers' prereading questions and discussion, and the SQ3R method (survey, question, read, recite, review). Directed reading activity, in which teachers guide students through reading assignments, is recommended. In addition, students should keep vocabulary notebooks. (Author/AV)
National Council for the Social Studies, 1515 Wilson Boulevard, Suite number 1, Arlington, Virginia 22209 ($1.00 paper copy, quantity discounts available)
Publication Type: Guides - General
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Council for the Social Studies, Washington, DC.
Note: For related documents, see SO 010 097-098 ; Not available in hard copy due to marginal legibility of the original document