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ERIC Number: ED139677
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975-Mar
Pages: 89
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
International Information, Education and Cultural Relations: Recommendations for the Future.
Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC. Center for Strategic and International Studies.
The report analyzes American government programs in international information, education, and cultural relations in order to provide recommendations for program improvement. A history of public diplomacy programs since World War II traces creation of the United States Information Agency (USIA) and the Bureau of Cultural Relations (CU) and analyzes their activities in areas of exchange of persons, general information, policy formation, and advisory functions. Objectives of American information and cultural activities are described as support for U.S. foreign policy and promotion of mutual understanding with foreign countries. The responsibilities of the Deputy Under Secretary of State for Policy Information and the activities of the Voice of America broadcast are discussed. Three major problems that the review panel identified are the division of one program between the USIA and the Department of State; the assignment of interpreting U.S. foreign policy to the world and advising in its formulation by a non-State Department agency; and the ambiguous position of the Voice of America between journalism and diplomacy. The panel concluded that these problems could be solved by combining presently fragmented policy and advisory functions into a new State Department Office of Policy Information. (Author/DB)
Center for strategic and International Studies, 1800 K Street, N.W., No. 520, Washington, D.C. 20006 ($3.95 plus $0.30 postage, paperback)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC. Center for Strategic and International Studies.
Note: Some pages in the annexes contain paragraphs of small sized print and may not reproduce clearly