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ERIC Number: ED138563
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-Apr
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Role of the Individual in Individualized Instruction: An Investigation of Student-Selected Instructional Planning.
Turnure, James E.; Morreau, Lanny E.
This study was designed to determine if (a) a developed interview procedure could be used to encourage students in both open and traditional schools to effectively state their educational goals and standards of performance in behavioral terms and (b) to determine if the goal statements obtained differed between the two school populations. Three students from each grade equivalent in an open school (K-12 grade range) and three from each grade in comparable traditional schools served as subjects. Results indicated that (a) 78 percent of the subjects gave statements of observable, measurable behaviors, (b) the 17 nonbehavioral responses could be stated behaviorally or reduced to smaller behavioral units by a teacher without distorting the student's intent, (c) 96 percent of the subjects gave measures that could be used to evaluate the quantity or quality of performance, and (d) 26 percent of the measures needed slight modification to be realistic criteria for the performance. Further analyses indicated that goals proposed by subjects from the two school populations were very similar in terms of subject matter areas covered. The only striking difference appeared to be a result of a recent stress placed on one subject area by the traditional schools. The study thus indicates that students at all grade levels from kindergarten through high school can contribute substantially to the formulation of individualized instruction. (Author/MM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, New York, April 4-8, 1977)