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ERIC Number: ED137231
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-Apr
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Personal Causation and Locus of Control: An Analysis of Selected Teacher Characteristics and Their Relations to Student Achievement.
Personal characteristics of 58-inner city teachers (fourth through eighth grades) were analyzed for their relations to student achievement. The assumption supporting this analysis is that teachers' influence upon students is pervasive and powerful and, therefore, knowledge of teachers' motivational beliefs (personal causation) and orientation (perception of locus of control) helps to account for variation in student achievement. Three expected relationships were tested: (1) the more a teacher has an internal locus of control, the more active and adaptive his classroom behavior is likely to be and the higher his students are likely to achieve; (2) the more a teacher generally experiences behavior with a sense of personal causation, the more purposive and determined his classroom behavior is likely to be and the higher his students are likely to achieve; and (3) the extent to which a teacher perceives behavior with an internal locus is unrelated to the extent to which a teacher experiences behavior with a sense of personal causation. The "Origin-Pawn Measure" and the "Internal-External Locus of Control Scale" were used to gather information on teacher characteristics; the "Iowa Test of Basic Skills" was used to measure student achievement. Findings support the distinction between personal causation and locus of control and demonstrate the value of each in analyzing the relationship between teacher characteristics and student achievement. (MM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New York, New York, April 4-8, 1977)