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ERIC Number: ED136907
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-Mar
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Intertask Correspondence in the 5 to 7 Shift: A Question of Competence Vs. Performance.
Kermis, Marguerite DeYaeger
This study attempts to determine if individual differences in multitask performance are due in part to the cognitive competence (i.e., the consistent, rule-based strategy) the subject brings to the task. A battery of learning (discrimination shift, transposition, incidental learning and paired-associate learning), cognitive-developmental (seriation, conservation of amount and transitivity) and psychometric (Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices) measures were administered to 120 children from kindergarten and second grades. Similarities and differences underlying children's problem-solving performance during this time were then assessed. Subjects were categorized into one of three performance levels for the criterion tasks, e.g., conserver/nonconserver/inconsistent conserver. Overall performance, as a function of age, sex and the respective performance categories, was assessed via canonical correlations and multiple regression analyses. The results indicated that performance on reversal shift and conservation alone predicted overall multitask performance (p<001). Moreover, there appeared to be a trend toward improved overall performance from nonperformers through inconsistent performers to perfect performers on the conservation task. The results suggest that while both reversal and conservation are indices of mediation, albeit rule-based strategies, conservation is a far more powerful predictor of overall task performance. These results suggest the feasibility of using multitask, multidomain research to better understand the nature of the development of cognition in children. (Author/MS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (New Orleans, Louisiana, March 17-20, 1977)