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ERIC Number: ED136902
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-Feb
Pages: 77
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teaching the Special Child in Regular Classrooms.
Klein, Jenni
This document includes a paper and a bibliography of ERIC abstracts on teaching the special child in mainstreamed classrooms. The paper presents five basic assumptions related to the teaching of young handicapped children, discusses principles of teaching special children which may be helpful to teachers working in mainstreamed classrooms, and looks briefly at the unresolved questions associated with teaching special children. The principles of teaching young handicapped children are based on the assumptions that: (1) the handicapped child has the same basic needs as all children; (2) handicapping conditions involve the whole child, not just the affected organ, limb or function; (3) handicapped children are individuals; (4) a handicap cannot be overlooked; and (5) handicapped children are entitled to equal opportunities to learn and develop. Teaching young handicapped children requires special knowledge and understanding, active intervention on behalf of the child, and orchestration of the many facets of a total program. The problems of mainstreaming, labeling, age of enrollment, and readiness are discussed. The selected ERIC bibliography on mainstreaming handicapped children includes resumes from "Resources in Education" (RIE), October 1976 through January 1977, and citations from "Current Index to Journals in Education" (CIJE), September 1976 through January 1977. (SB)
ERIC Clearinghouse on Early Childhood Education, University of Illinois, 805 West Pennnsylvania Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (Catalog No. 158, $2.75)
Publication Type: Reference Materials - Bibliographies
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Early Childhood Education, Champaign, IL.; Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Note: Paper contains an ERIC Abstract Bibliography