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ERIC Number: ED133381
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1976-Aug
Pages: 42
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
School Desegregation and the Status Attainment Process: Some Results from Rural Schools.
Falk, William W.
The primary goal of this study was to determine if attending desegregated schools has a measurable impact on mobility attitudes and status attainments. This study restricted itself to rural black respondents who had attended segregated-only or segregated and desegregated schools. Two lines of analysis were followed. The first dealt exclusively with a comparison of the levels of mobility aspirations, perceived blockages and assuredness, and actual educational attainment. The second type of analysis assessed the processual differences between segregated and desegregated students. In this case, three models were tested for both groups to see if the theorized causal linkages varied between groups. The findings of critical importance seem to be centered around the educational variables. First, when educational attitudes were regressed on each other, the coefficient between the 1968 and 1972 Levels of Educational Aspiration was much larger for the desegregated group. This suggested that the desegregated group had much greater stability in maintaining its educational attitudes. Second, the larger difference in the relationships between the 1968 level of Educational Aspiration and Educational Attainment suggests that a much greater correspondence between educational plans and educational behavior exists for the desegregated group. These findings suggest that youth who attend desegregated schools differ somehow in the process of attitude formation and maintenance, and status attainment. (Author/JM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. Agricultural Experiment Station.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society (New York, August 1976)