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ERIC Number: ED133250
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1976-Jul-13
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Trends in Publishing for Ethnic Studies: Afro Americans, Native American, and Spanish Speaking.
Jackson, Miles M.
Portrayal of racial minorities in textbooks is discussed and the practice of textbook publishers in their treatment of the roles of minorities during the 1960s to the present is traced. America transmits the dominant ideals and values of its culture to students through textbooks. Until the 1960s, racial minorities were generally ignored by writers and publishers of textbooks. Consequently, millions of American youth passed through schools without having read much about African Americans, American Indians, or Puerto Ricans. The social revolution during the 1960s encouraged publishers to venture into publishing textbooks that portrayed minorities fairly, but special editions of standard textbooks tailored to meet regional biases were still being produced. A 1975 study by the American Jewish Committee focused a year-long analysis on African Americans, Mexican Americans, and native Americans and concluded that racism can still be found in social studies textbooks. Trade book publishers have been quick to realize the huge profits in minority themes and have often published or reprinted books of questionable quality. Minority publishing is improving, however, partly through the encouragement of groups such as the Council on Interracial Books for Children. Educators, textbook writers, publishers, parents, and other interested persons must not become complacent given moderate gains. They must encourage minority writers and publishing houses to select quality minority educational materials. (Author/DB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at The World Educators Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, July 10-15, 1976)