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ERIC Number: ED132134
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1976
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Improving Socio-Emotional Classroom Climate by Communicating the Degree to Which Statements Are Considered by Teachers to be Subjectively Held.
Redman, George L.
Teachers should find it of value to become more cognizant of the degree to which they communicate awareness of subjectivity since the more accepting the socioemotional climate of the classroom, the greater will be the opportunity for expanded thinking, sharing of differing points of view, and learning in general. This awareness could be determined by measuring the degree to which the teacher signals that a point of view expressed in a given message is intended to represent a subjective perspective and that other points of view on the issue may, are likely to, or surely do exist. A system for classifiying teacher statements on the basis of sensitivity to subjectivity communicated in and through qualifying phrases would be useful in both research and practical use. A preliminary categorization might be the division of statements into two broad categories, with accompanying subsets. (1) statements that indirectly signal recognition of message subjectivity, (a) phrases that identify persons holding the point of view expressed in the original message, including those phrases which (i) expand, or (ii) limit the psychological room of the receiver to hold differing opinions; and (2) statements that directly express acceptance of the subjective nature of personal judgments, including (a) phrases expressing the right of others to hold differing points of view, and (b) phrases identifying persons who hold (or could hold) differing points of view. (MB)
George L. Redman, Department of Education, Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota 55014 ($1.00)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A