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ERIC Number: ED131624
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1976-May
Pages: 263
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Elementary Versus Special Education Teachers' Perceptions in Handling Learning, Behavior, and Neurological Problems. Final Report.
Minor, James A.
Presented is the final report of a field survey involving 140 teachers which was conducted to determine whether elementary teachers, as compared to special education teachers, feel adequate in teaching children who exhibit learning, behavior, and neurological problems. Sections in chapter 1 address the need for the study, a statement of the problem, questions to be answered, delimitations, definitions, and an overview of study procedures. A review of the literature (chapter 2) notes that problems identified on the basis of teacher perception tend to be indicative of future academic performance of the child and of the need for some type of special education service. Study procedures are discussed in detail in chapter 3 on the theory and rationale of the survey instrument, selection of the items for the instrument, the field test of the instrument, and the teacher survey. Tables are provided in chapter 4 on the statistical analysis of teacher responses. Results are summarized in chapter 5 as concluding that the teachers feel relatively adequate about the instructional approaches they report they would use for children exhibiting symptoms within each problem area; however, as teachers experience failure in assisting a child with problems, the likelihood for requesting assistance for special service increases. Appended material includes a copy of the self-report needs survey, the letter for the second follow-up questionnaire, eight item groups used during the field-test phase, and tables with raw data. (SBH)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Bureau of Education for the Handicapped (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Ed. D. Dissertation, University of South Dakota