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ERIC Number: ED130073
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1976-Aug
Pages: 212
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Organizational Policy Decisions as a Function of Individual Differences and Task Design: Monitoring Tasks. Technical Report 9.
Forbes, J. Benjamin; And Others
Two visual monitoring tasks were used to further knowledge of the interactions between individual differences and task demands as determinants of performance and satisfaction. The subjects, 100 male university students, completed pre- and post-test batteries to assess general and specific abilities, personality variables, work orientation, motivation, and preferences for job structural attributes. Following the pre-testing, each subject performed the visual monitoring tasks--one complex and one simple. Both tasks involved monitoring slides for three 1-hour sessions for the presence of triangles or circles embedded within 60 irrelevant stimuli. The complex task (labeled high demands condition) differed from the simple task (labeled low demands condition) only with respect to the demand placed upon cognitive abilities. Results showed that both performance and satisfaction are related to individual differences in ability as well as selected personality and preference measures. The congruence between task demands and abilities was found to be highly significant in determining these relationships. It is suggested that one way to optimize performance and satisfaction involves designing the job so that the task demands match the ability levels of the individuals from which job selection is made. Implications are also made for use of prior and present experiment results for the selection of Navy personnel. Appendixes include the task instructions for the experiment and seven different tables of correlations. (SH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA. Personnel and Training Research Programs Office.
Authoring Institution: Akron Univ., OH. Dept. of Psychology.