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ERIC Number: ED128701
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Cognitive Differentiation and Impression Formation: An Integration Theory Approach.
Millimet, C. Raymond; Brien, Monica
Consistent with Anderson's weighted averaging model, it was predicted that 19 subjects who were defined by a lack of differentiation among their personal constructs would experience considerable inconsistency in the factorial combination of five personality trait dimensions selected from each subject's REP test. Such inconsistency was expected to evoke a configural component of judgment in the form of stimulus discounting. In contrast, 19 subjects who were defined by high differentiation among their personal constructs were not expected to experience inconsistency in the factorial combinations of five personality trait dimensions selected from each subject's REP test. A strict linear model was expected to account for the judgments of these subjects. A 2x2x2x2x2 factorial analysis of variance was performed on the judgments of each subject and the number of significant main effects (linearity of judgment) and interaction effects (configurality of judgment) between the two experimental groups were compared. Although most of the judgmental variance of both experimental groups was accounted for by a strong linear process, a psychologically meaningful configural process was noted in the judgments of both experimental groups. The configurality was consistent with a weighted averaging model, but was qualitiatively different in form in the two groups of subjects. (Author)
C. Raymond Millimet, Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska 68101
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, (83rd, Chicago, Illinois, August 30 to September 2, 1975); not available in hard copy due to marginal legibility of original document