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ERIC Number: ED126021
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Technique to Provide Lecturers with Continuous Student Feedback.
Geller, E. Scott; And Others
In an attempt to shape better teaching, 18 students were given the opportunity to provide continuous feedback to a college instructor concerning a particular aspect of his lecturing. A student feedback device (SFD) used in this research consists of three major parts: (1) a feedback panel containing 18 indicator lights, each light being clearly visible by the lecturer; (2) 18 silent, push-button switches, each spring-return button being connected to a separate indicator light that illuminates whenever the button is pushed and remains illuminated as long as the button is held down with slight pressure; and (3) 18 ink pens that draw continuous lines on recording paper unrolling at a specific speed and controlled by a particular feedback button. In one experiment, feedback occurred whenever the students in an advanced psychology class and a graduate statistics class did not understand the lecture material. A second application of the SFD in these classes required eight students to depress their buttons as long as the lecture was too slow; while eight other students responded when the lecture was too fast. Both undergraduate and graduate students showed resistance and difficulty in making appropriate on-the-spot judgments of understanding and indicated a very high tolerance for slow, boring lecturing, but a low tolerance for a fast lecture pace. Thus, the research showed how continuous feedback can be presented to lecturers, but clearly illustrated a need for procedural refinements to make such feedback appropriate. (Author/MM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association (83rd, Chicago, Illinois, August 30 - September 3, 1975) ; Not available in hard copy due to marginal reproducibility of original document