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ERIC Number: ED121741
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1976
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Responses to Classroom Misbehavior: Influence Methods in a Perilous Equilibrium.
DeFlaminis, John A.
This paper describes a study which had a twofold purpose. The first was to determine which methods of influence were used by teachers to control pupils who exhibited various types of disruptive misbehavior. The second purpose of this study was to determine why teachers chose those specific methods of control. Influence was considered from the perspective of the person being influenced (the student). Six methods of influence were defined and utilized: authority, coercion, situational and relational contract, persuasion, and manipulation. These six influence methods were grouped into three categories of influence (unwilling, willing, and unwitting) which were used to describe how the teacher's judgment was substituted for that of the students. Eighty-five certified classroom teachers from Eugene, Oregon, comprised the sample for this study. This sample covered grade levels 1-12. While the school district selected the schools in the sample, volunteers were recruited from the faculties to complete the instrument (Influence Inventory). A stratified random sample of 40 teachers was selected from this population to participate in a follow-up interview. The Influence Inventory contained 16 hypothetical situations to which teachers responded. Each situation contained a combination of four facets: (1) duration of disruptive misbehavior, (2) students' motivation to learn, (3) sex of student, and (4) student's ability group. A follow-up interview was used in this study to elicit the teacher's subjective reasons for using the methods of influence chosen. (Author)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, California, April 1976)