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ERIC Number: ED120625
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975-Dec
Pages: 274
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Advance Organizers and Within-Text Questions on the Learning of a Taxonomy of Concepts. Technical Report No. 357.
Bernard, Michael E.
This study, presented in three parts, investigated the effects of a group of single-concept instructional variables on the learning at an advanced level of attainment of taxonomy of behavior management concepts. The effects of presenting advance organizers and inserting within-text questions was also examined. The influence of the single-concept instructional variables, advance organizers, and within-test questions on the understanding of supraordinate-coordinate-subordinate relationships among the concepts within the taxonomy and in the recognition of the position of each concept within the taxonomy was also investigated. Subjects were 208 twelfth-grade students. Subject read a series of three written instructional or placebo lessons on three successive days. Several versions of the lessons were prepared in which the instructional variables of interest were systematically varied. The potential differential effectiveness of the instructional lessons constituted the experimental focus of concern. Single concept instructional variables resulted in a significant amount of learning across the three assessment measures in comparison with a condition of no instruction. A main effect of advance organizer and within-text questioning was found across each of the three assessment measures. It was hypothesized that advance organizers permitted subjects to sort the diverse and related information presented in the instructional lessons into separate categories. (Author)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Research and Development Center for Cognitive Learning.
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Wisconsin