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ERIC Number: ED116809
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975-Apr
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Reinforcement of Feminine-Preferred Behavior Revisited.
Fagot, Beverly I.
The two studies reported, on teacher reinforcement of and teacher attitudes toward children's sex-preferred behaviors attempted to clarify some issues concerning the differential treatment of boys and girls at the preschool level. The first study looked at teacher reinforcement of sex-preferred behaviors in children aged 3 to 5 years as a function of the experience of the teacher. Six children of each sex in each of four independent play groups were observed with their teachers; a coded observation schedule was used to compare the patterns of teacher reinforcement for sex-preferred behaviors and the amounts of teacher response for boys and girls and for experienced and inexperienced teachers. Results indicated that all teachers responded in equal amounts to boys and girls and reinforce feminine preferred behaviors not only in girls but also in boys. The second study compared sex stereotyping and educational attitudes of college students of both sexes who were either experienced or inexperienced in dealing with young children. Subjects were asked to rate 31 child behaviors either on sex appropriateness or on importance for future academic performance. Results showed that 12 behaviors were considered sex stereotyped, six male and six female, and that inexperienced persons rated behaviors as stereotyped significantly more frequently than experienced persons. The two studies indicated teacher experience rather than sex of teacher to be a determinant of teacher classroom behavior and brought into question the differential effects on boys and girls of being reinforced for behaviors which are preferred by girls and nonpreferred by boys. (GO)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (Denver, Colorado, April 10-13, 1975)