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ERIC Number: ED113323
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975-Mar
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Greek Athletics in the Writings of the Greek Historians.
Shelden, Miriam F.
The purpose of this study was to find out what Greek historians actually said about athletics during the centuries 700 B.C. to 400 A.D. To achieve this, the writings of Greek historians were systematically examined for words, phrases, sentences, and comments pertaining to or mentioning Greek athletics and athletes. These were recorded on separate cards, and eventually classified according to topic. Topics were then grouped under the following three headings: (1) the individual and athletics; (2) festivals; and (3) outgrowths of athletics. Concepts related to the role of athletics in Greek society were derived from these groupings of quotations and references. In relation to the first topic, it was found that the individual athlete in Greek society benefited from athletics both intrinsically and extrinsically through individual exercise and public honor. Concerning the second topic, it was found that attending festivals and athletic contests was a way of life for the Greek people (historians mentioned 37 different festivals and countless other athletic contests which were not given specific names). With regard to the third topic, it was found that almost everyone in the Greek world was affected by athletics, either directly or indirectly. For example, time was measured in Olympiads, locations were given in relation to athletic sites, and artists used athletes as models for their works. In conclusion, the author states that athletics and sport were integral to the thinking and concerns of Greek historians. (Author/BD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (Atlantic City, New Jersey, March 1975)