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ERIC Number: ED110326
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975-Mar
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effect of Intensive Instruction in Cue Attendance and Hypothesis Generation Upon Open Exploration Behavior of Low and High Ability Ninth Grade Students.
Wright, Emmett L.; Fowler, H. Seymour
The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of intensive instruction (II) in either the observation of details (cue attendance - CA) or the production of tenable hypotheses (hypothesis generation - HG) about a science problem. Two questions were investigated: (1) Were there significant differences between students intensively instructed in either CA or HG and the control group? (2) Were there significant differences between students intensively instructed in CA and students intensively instructed in HG? From 120 randomly selected high and low ability ninth-grade biology students, 40 were assigned to each of three treatment groups. Immediately following II, students individually viewed in random order three other filmloops. Results indicated that II students in CA and HG performed significantly better on all the dependent variables when compared to the control group, except in the case of the quantity of CA where no difference was found between the HG group and the control group and that both groups performed equally well on all dependent variables except for the quantity of CA where II CA observed a greater number of details. Finally, no significant differences were found between low-ability groups or between high-ability groups (for either aptitude) on each of the dependent variables. (Author/BR)
ERIC/SMEAC, The Ohio State University, 400 Lincoln Tower, Columbus, OH 43210 (on loan)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (48th, Los Angeles, California, March 1975); Marginal legibility