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ERIC Number: ED110279
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1972
Pages: 191
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Comparison of the Affective Behavior of Students Enrolled in Various High School Science Courses as Measured by an Instrument Developed Using the Affective Domain Continuum.
Downs, Gary Eugene
The purpose of this study was to compare the affective behavior of students enrolled in the various high school science courses. The sample for the study included eight science courses. The sample for the study included eight science classes consisting of the following: 45 ninth-grade Introductory Physical Science students, 46 tenth-grade biology students, 47 eleventh- and twelfth-grade chemistry students, and 52 eleventh- and twelfth-grade physics students. The instrument used to measure the students' affective behavior, the Affective Domain Measuring Scale (ADMS), was developed using Thurstone's techniques and the first four categories of the affective domain continuum published by Krathwohl in 1964. Mean scores were calculated from the students' responses on pretest and posttest exercises. The t-ratio was used to test for significance. The following conclusions were made: (1) the affective behavior of most science students changed in the unfavorable direction, (2) the high school science students enrolled in physics and chemistry have a more favorable affective behavior toward science than do the biology and Introductory Physical Science students, (3) physics, chemistry, biology and Introductory Physical Science students experience different amounts of change in affective behavior during one semester, (4) males have a more favorable affective behavior toward science than do females, and (5) females' affective behavior toward science changes more than males' affective behavior toward science in one semester. (Author/MLH)
University Microfilms, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 72-23,799, MF-$5.00, Xerography-$11.00)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Ed.D. Dissertation, University of Northern Colorado