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ERIC Number: ED108697
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1975-Apr
Pages: 75
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Study of Messages Received by Children Who Viewed an Episode of "The Harlem Globetrotters Popcorn Machine".
Child Research Service, Inc., New York, NY.; Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc., New York, NY. Office of Social Research.
A total of 687 children, aged 7 through 11, was interviewed in fall, 1974 to determine the extent to which the Harlem Globetrotters Popcorn Machine television programs communicated "pro-social" messages to its audience. Viewers of four different episodes of the Globetrotters were questioned about the program they had seen. Among the findings were: (1) overall, 87 percent of the children received one or more specific pro-social messages from the episode he or she viewed; (2) older children (10-11) were more likely to play back at least one pro-social message than were younger children (7-8), and middle class children were more likely to do so than lower class children; (3) reception of pro-social messages was not related to frequency of viewing the Globetrotters; (4) both distortion of pro-social messages and spontaneous reporting of the relevance of such messages to the child's own life were rare; (5) the themes of "honesty,""kindness," and "safety" were more readily grasped than was "loyalty;" (6) certain "recurring" pro-social messages were communicated by several episodes, and "golden rule" messages were played back most frequently; (7) "slippage" was indicated by the fact that 35 percent of the children stated that the Globetrotters taught them to play basketball or to spell; and (8) children thought the Globetrotters both entertained and set a good moral example. (Author/DGC)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Child Research Service, Inc., New York, NY.; Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc., New York, NY. Office of Social Research.