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ERIC Number: ED107413
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1975-May
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Title I Migrant Education Program. Education Briefing Paper.
Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Compensatory Education.
Today there are more than a million children whose parents follow the crops for a living. Since their families move so often, these children are never in one school long enough to have a chance to really learn. Complicating matters, many of them can't speak English. Congress recognized the migrant child's special educational needs in November 1966 when it amended the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title I, giving the U.S. Office of Education (USOE) authority and funds to improve the educational programs and offer supplementary services for the migrant child. Today, Title I serves approximately 400,000 children at a cost of over $90 million. In 1974, the use of the Migrant Student Record Transfer System was authorized to trace the whereabouts of each child as he migrates from one harvest to another. Although progress has been significant since the enactment of the 1966 amendment, USOE is constantly seeking new and better ways to help the migrant child move out of the fields and into more rewarding occupations. Among its future plans are: (1) a career education program for K-12 and (2) endorsement of interstate cooperation. As more and more migrants leave the stream, the migrant education program will focus more on the 5-year-old child--the child who stays in one spot but still needs special help. (NQ)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Compensatory Education.
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title I