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ERIC Number: ED104853
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1975-Apr
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Nonverbal Behavior in Tutoring Interactions.
Feldman, Robert S.
This document reports on a series of studies carried out concerning nonverbal behavior in peer tutoring interactions. The first study examined the encoding (enactment) of nonverbal behavior in a tutoring situation. Results clearly indicated that the tutor's nonverbal behavior was affected by the performance of the tutee. The question of whether or not nonverbal "leakage" (failure to hide undesired displays of negative affect) occurs was raised in this study and tested in another. Findings from the second study indicated that tutors encode differentially according to whether or not they are being truthful, and moreover, that other untrained students were capable of decoding such behavior. Because the difference in the tutor's nonverbal behavior in the above situation could have been caused by the lying itself, or by his/her negative feelings regarding the failing tutee, a third study was performed to determine causality. Results from this study indicated that both factors--deception and a dislike for the tutee--cause negative verbal behavior in the tutor. A fourth study was carried out to determine the tutor's ability to understand the meaning of the nonverbal behavior of a tutee in regard to his/her degree of comprehension. Results revealed that (a) children encode nonverbally the degree of comprehension of material being presented to them, and (b) their nonverbal behavior can be decoded by other children. These studies indicate that nonverbal behavior is, in fact, an important factor in the tutoring situation and must be considered when examining tutoring interactions. (PB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, D.C., April 1975)