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ERIC Number: ED102796
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1974
Pages: 73
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Callier-Azusa Scale.
Stillman, Robert D., Ed.
Presented is the Callier-Azusa Scale designed to aid in the assessment of deaf-blind and multihandicapped children in the areas of motor development, perceptual abilities, daily living skills, language development, and socialization. The scale is said to be predicated on the assumption that given the appropriate environment all children follow the normal development sequence and to be useful for initial assessment, measuring progress over time, and planning developmentally appropriate programs. Within each of the five areas are subscales made of sequential steps describing developmental milestones. It is stressed that the scale is based on observation of ongoing classroom behaviors and should be administered by individuals familiar with the child. Briefly explained are criteria for assessing developmental level and the use of scoring sheets (attached). Provided with many of the behavioral items are examples and a space for teacher comments. Subscales are provided for the following abilities: postural control, locomotion, fine motor, and visual-motor (in the area of motor development); visual development, auditory development, and tactile development (in the area of perceptual abilities); undressing and dressing, personal hygiene, feeding skills, and toileting (in the area of daily living skills); receptive language, expressive language, and speech (in the area of language development); and socialization and development of self-concept (in the area of socialization). Items range from "only takes bottle" to "prepares simple foods not requiring measurement" in the development of feeding skills. (LS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Bureau of Education for the Handicapped (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Callier Center for Communication Disorders, Dallas, TX.