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ERIC Number: ED102040
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1972-Nov
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Past and Current Status of Regional Cooperation Among African-Oriented College-Level Teachers in the Southeastern United States.
Davis, R. Hunt, Jr.
Four factors which affect the status of African Studies in the southeastern United States are: (1) the largeness of the South as a geographical area, (2) lack of concentrations of African-oriented scholars in the region, (3) the relatively new addition of African Studies to southern university curriculums, and (4) the frequent involvement in African Studies of persons from outside the South. Existing patterns of cooperation involve the regional disciplinary associations, interdisciplinary cooperation at the regional level, and activity at the state level. The regional association showing the highest interest is the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers while the Southern Economics Association has shown the least. Most state wide activity in African Studies is at the University of Florida African Studies Center. The current level of interest in organizing a regional association of Africanists among persons teaching about Africa in the Southeast demonstrates a marked contrast to what has taken place. In response to a survey of southeastern Africanists, 95 percent of the respondents believe that a regional organization would be of value. As a result arrangements have been made to establish this organization. The three leading priorities are the establishment of a newsletter, organization of panel discussions at regional disciplinary association meetings, and the organization of an annual meeting. (DE)
African Studies Association, 218 Shiffman Humanities Center, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts 02154 ($0.75)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the African Studies Association (15th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 1972)