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ERIC Number: ED081624
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1972
Pages: 83
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Study of the Relationship Between Conceptual Tempo and Problem-Solving Abilities of Fourth-Grade Children.
Walek, Bruce Peter
The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between a fourth-grade child's impulsive-reflective response style and two aspects of his problem-solving ability--the ability to select the proper arithmetic operation in a verbal arithmetic problem and the ability to estimate. The entire fourth-grade enrollment of three schools took the arithmetic subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test, and, from these students, 63 high achievers and 63 low achievers were selected at random. The Matching Familiar Figures Test was administered to each of these students to identify impulsive-reflective cognitive styles. A performance test on the two aspects of mathematical problem-solving ability was developed by the author and given to the students. Results showed that reflective students, both without regard to achievement status and also within the two achievement categories, did significantly better than the impulsive subjects on selecting the appropriate arithmetic operation and on the entire test. The impulsive subjects had a slightly smaller mean error score on the estimation tasks, but not significantly. The performance of high achievers, both without regard to response style and within the impulsive category, was significantly better than that of low achievers on both sections of the test separately and on the entire test. Reflective high achievers did significantly better than reflective low achievers on selecting the proper operation and on the entire test. (Author/DT)
University Microfilms, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 73-15,550 Microfilm-$4.00, Xerography-$10.00)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Florida