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ERIC Number: ED079344
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1956-Dec
Pages: 3
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Aptitude, Intelligence, and Achievement.
Wesman, Alexander G.
Test Service Bulletin, n50 p4-6 Dec 1956
Ways in which to determine whether the aptitude, intelligence, or achievement test is more helpful are discussed. A test's function, i.e., how the test results are used, appears to be the most logical method of discriminating between the types of tests. In educational testing, if the purpose is to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching or training, and the test is designed to measure what has been specifically taught, it is an achievement test. The same holds true if the intent is to grade students on the basis of what they have learned in a course. If the interest is only in predicting grades, a numerical aptitude test is perhaps best. If it is desired to predict success in several subjects at the same time, achievement tests can be used. This approach is most effective where past and future courses are most alike. Achievement tests can function as aptitude measures best in the early school years, less well at the junior and senior high school levels where courses became increasingly differentiated. Another possible choice for predicting success in various courses is the scholastic aptitude or so-called group intelligence test. To the extent that various courses demand verbal and/or numerical facility for successful learning, a test that measures those aptitudes will probably prove useful. A third alternative is the use of differential aptitude test batteries, which provide broader coverage of mental functioning than the scholastic aptitude test. In the business world, multi-score employment tests are often more useful than single-score tests in employee selection. (For related document, see TM 002 944.) (DB)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Psychological Corp., New York, NY.
Note: Reprint from Test Service Bulletin