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ERIC Number: ED075450
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1972-Dec-8
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Hazards in Research Involving Minorities.
Davis, Junius A.
A survey was conducted by the Educational Testing Service to evaluate the impact of federally supported college programs for disadvantaged students. The purposes were to identify successful programs and learn what factors were associated with effectiveness, using student-centered criteria of success, satisfaction and continuance in school. A national sample of 120 institutions was used. A questionnaire was designed to avoid cultural bias. Arrangements were made to nominate interested students from target groups to be trained, returned to campus to conduct interviews on their own terms, and reconvened with researchers to discuss findings. Several hazards were encountered: (1) labeling--any term devised to describe disadvantaged groups eventually takes on negative, pejorative connotations; (2) many students would not participate in the study unless their ethnic group was allowed to conduct and control the study (an effort was made to stop the survey nationwide through nonparticipation); (3) many students distrusted any study or questionnaire devised by ETS, which is seen as a primary perpetuator of the discriminatory system; (4) students trusted researchers of their own ethnic group even less than white researchers, seeing them as having been totally assimilated into the majority at the expense of their ethnic identity. It is suggested that social scientists must find some successful way of dealing with minority students if they are to survive as researchers. (For related documents, see TM 002 526, 528-541.) (KM)
Not available separately; see TM 002 526
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at Session I of Southeastern Invitational Conference on Measurement in Education (11th, Athens, Georgia, December 8, 1972)