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ERIC Number: ED073892
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1970-Aug-28
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Ideology of an American Indian Social Movement and the Revolt Against Anthropologists.
Henning, Marilyn J.
Among young American Indians, a radical social movement has been evolving, as has a common ideology, because historical and social conditions have unified tribes in an awareness of a common identity and a common set of problems. A key tenet of this ideology has been a challenge to the legitimacy of the social sciences. This aspect of the movement was brought to the attention of a group of applied anthropologists at a workshop on Indian education. At the workshop, militant Indians charged that the scientific knowledge of the anthropologists was not pertinent to Indians and that the motives of anthropologists have been based upon exploitation of the Indian people. The paper presented 2 models for interaction between anthropologists and their subjects which were implied in the responses to a questionnaire sent to the anthropologists involved in the workshop. The respondents preferred the first model, which is based upon a professional/client relationship. In this model, the anthropologist's role is to apply his knowledge and skill in the research of social problems as defined by a community, and his goal is to provide solutions for these problems. As applied anthropology is now known, the problems investigated are usually defined by an innovative organization committed to the goals of modernization, development, and modification of human behavior. However, it is apparent that some anthropological research projects have fostered misunderstanding. The episode at the workshop pointed out that anthropology has frequently promised more than it has been able to deliver. (FF)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Rural Sociological Society meeting (Washington, D.C., August 28, 1970)