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ERIC Number: ED072398
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1972
Pages: 162
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Use of Reading and Listening Tests to Diagnose and Match Students' Learning Needs with Respect to Reading or Listening Modes of Presentation of Programed Material.
Arnesen, James Francis
The purpose of this study was to determine whether students who had been diagnosed as reading learners (by scoring above the mean on the advanced California Reading Test) or listening learners (by scoring above the mean on form Am of the Brown Carlsen Listening Comprehension Test) achieve at the same level using programed material presented in a corresponding mode as students for whom the mode of presentation of the programed study material was contrary to their diagnosed mode. The population consisted of 97 students enrolled in the Science Foundations Classes at the University of Iowa. The students were administered the diagnostic reading and listening tests, and four groups were formed on the basis of the IQ section scores. All students who scored above the mean on both tests were designated to group HRHL (high reading; high listening). The other three major groups, HRLL (high reading; low listening), LRHL (low reading; high listening), and LRLL (low reading; low listening), were formed in the same manner. Some of the results indicated: (1) the diagnosed HRHL groups performed best and LRLL groups worst; (2) in the X test, students were not found to be able to choose the same mode as would be diagnosed by the reading and listening tests; and (3) in the area of efficiency there were no significant differences except for the LRHL (listening mode performed better than the reading mode). (Author/WR)
University Microfilms, A Xerox Company, Dissertation Copies, Post Office Box 1764, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 (Order No. 72-26,648, MFilm $4.00, Xerography $10.00)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Iowa