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ERIC Number: ED071934
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1972
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Machiavellianism and Religiosity as Determinants of Cognitive Dissonance in a Counterattitudinal Situation.
Widgery, Robin N.; Tubbs, Stewart L.
Two hypotheses are examined: 1) Low Machiavellians writing counterattitudinal essays will report greater attitude change toward the direction of the position advocated than will high Machiavellians; and 2) Intrinsically religious persons writing counterattitudinal essays will report greater attitude change toward the direction of the position advocated than will extrinsically religious persons. Machiavellianism is defined as a high need to control others, regardless of the attending ethical considerations. Intrinsically religious persons are motivated to practice their beliefs in everyday life; extrinsically religious persons use religion as a utilitarian method for self-gain. Sixty-six subjects were classified as High or Low Machs on the basis of the Christie et al. Machiavellianism Scale and as Intrinsically or Extrinsically Religious on the Allport and Ross Religiosity Scale. The experimental group of 53 wrote essays advocating two years mandatory military service prior to college enrollment; they believed these were to be read by persons who were undecided on the issue. Pretesting had indicated that no subjects supported this proposition. It was believed that writing the counterattitudinal essay would induce greater cognitive dissonance, and hence attitudinal change, in Low Machs and Intrinsically Religious subjects. Posttesting revealed that Low Machs displayed greater attitude change than did High Machs; however, the religiosity hypothesis was not confirmed. (KW)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: General Motors Inst., Flint, MI. Dept. of Communication and Organizational Behavior.