NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED071884
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1968
Pages: 73
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Project Physics Handbook 1, Concepts of Motion.
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.
Thirteen experiments and 15 activities are presented in this unit handbook for student use. The experiment sections are concerned with naked-eye observation in astronomy, regularity and time, variations in data, uniform motion, gravitational acceleration, Galileo's experiments, Netson's laws, inertial and gravitational mass, trajectories, and circular motion. Suggestions for demonstrations, construction projects, and self-directed instructions are given in the activity sections to deal with aspects of stroboscopes, frictionless pucks, air resistance, time determination, falling weights, accelerometers, projectile motion, motion in a rotating reference frame, centripetal forces, and harmonograms. Methods of keeping records, using the Polaroid Camera, and physics readers are discussed in the introductory section. The four chapters in the handbook are designed to correspond to the text, with complete instructions in each experiment. Some experiments and activities are suggested in assignments, and the remaining are open to students' free selection. Illustrations and film loop notes for explanation purposes are included. Additional suggestions for activities, a guide for planet and eclipse observations, and the best time for viewing meteor showers are also provided as appendices. The work of Harvard Project Physics has been financially supported by: the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the United States Office of Education, and Harvard University. (CC)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Bureau of Research.
Authoring Institution: Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.