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ERIC Number: ED071735
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1972
Pages: 2
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Live Versus Televised Observations of Social Behavior in Preschool Children.
Paulson, F. Leon
Proceedings, 80th Annual Convention, APA, 1972, p135-136
An investigation to compare systematic behavioral observations made live with those made on television was conducted. The study was designed to answer three questions: (1) Is there a difference in the agreement between observers (Os) when both view an event Live and when both view the same event on Television? (2) Is there a difference in agreement between Os in the same viewing condition (either Live or Television) and between different viewing conditions (Live and Television)? and (3) What part of the variance can be attributed to (a) individual differences in the children, (b) individual differences among Os, and (c) viewing conditions (Live or Television)? The Ss were 12 boys and 12 girls between the ages of 39 and 57 months. All testing was conducted on same-sex dyads. Two situations were presented. In the Block-Stacking situation, Ss were given two piles of 10-cm. cardboard cubes and asked to build a pile taller than themselves. For the Draw-a-House situation, a 60 X 90 cm. piece of paper on which outlines of the two ends of a house were drawn was fastened to the floor. The Ss were rated on the level of their cooperative behavior. The study lends support for the use of television or videotape as a methodology in behavioral ratings. Ratings of the social behavior of young children made on television are comparable to observations made by live Os. The results also indicate that caution should be exercised when employing television. When the amount of error in the observations was high, viewing condition influenced the result. (CK)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (80th, Hoolulu, Hawaii, September 2-8, 1972)