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ERIC Number: ED070434
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1972-Oct
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Three-Year B.A.: A Wavering Idea.
Van Gelder, Eduard
Current literature on the three-year B.A. degree is reviewed as to its history, recent background, and anticipated problems (curriculum, finance, quality, and role of community colleges). The three-year degree dates back to 1640, when it was awarded at Harvard until about 1655. Three-year B.A. degrees received new impetus during the late 19th and early 20th century at Johns Hopkins, Columbia, Chicago, and Yale, as well as many other American colleges and universities. Recent interest in reducing the undergraduate program to three years is in programs that not only cut costs but also accelerate the educational process without loss of quality or content. Two programs that have proven most popular in attempts to shorten the length of the undergraduate program are the College Advanced Placement Program and the College Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. The problem of curriculum is discussed from the viewpoints of educators and students. The extent to which three-year degree programs would alleviate the financial crisis in higher education remains to be determined. It appears that unless not only the degree requirements but also the over all enrollment are reduced financial savings will not be realized. As to the quality of education in a shortened program, it is felt that any three-year degree program that emphasizes further cutbacks in general education will widen the communications gap brought about by training in minute specialties. The suggestion that community colleges offer three-year degrees is said to have little merit, as such a program would change these institutions from their original purpose of meeting the educational needs of the community. It is concluded that thoughts of a three-year degree should be abandoned. (DB)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Florida Univ., Gainesville. Inst. of Higher Education.
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: College Level Examination Program