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Carlson, Wendy; Rose, Amanda J. – Journal of Adolescence, 2012
Whereas much research addresses relations of youths' heterosexual romantic relationships with sexual and/or delinquent activities, less attention has been paid to youths' more normative, day-to-day activities with romantic partners. This gap in the literature is problematic given that these activities define the substance of the relationships and…
Descriptors: Intimacy, Correlation, Interpersonal Relationship, Sexuality
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Waller, Erika M.; Rose, Amanda J. – Journal of Adolescence, 2013
The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with…
Descriptors: Well Being, Adolescents, Mothers, Self Disclosure (Individuals)
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Smith, Rhiannon L.; Rose, Amanda J. – Developmental Psychology, 2011
The current research considered the costs of caring in youths' friendships. The development of a new construct, empathetic distress, allowed for a direct test of the commonly held belief that females suffer greater vicarious distress in response to close others' stressors and problems than do males. Empathetic distress refers to one's strongly…
Descriptors: Caring, Females, Perspective Taking, Friendship
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Glick, Gary C.; Rose, Amanda J. – Developmental Psychology, 2011
The proposal that friendships provide a context for the development of social skills is widely accepted. Yet little research exists to support this claim. In the present study, children and adolescents (N = 912) were presented with vignettes in which a friend encountered a social stressor and they could help the friend and vignettes in which they…
Descriptors: Friendship, Correlation, Interpersonal Competence, Children
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Waller, Erika M.; Rose, Amanda J. – Journal of Adolescence, 2010
The current study examined co-rumination (i.e., extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) in the context of mother-adolescent relationships. Fifth-, eighth-, and eleventh-graders (N = 516) reported on co-rumination and more normative self-disclosure with mothers, their relationships with mothers, and their own…
Descriptors: Mothers, Daughters, Parent Child Relationship, Depression (Psychology)
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Swenson, Lance P.; Rose, Amanda J. – Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 2009
Some evidence suggests that close friends may be knowledgeable of youth's psychological adjustment. However, friends are understudied as reporters of adjustment. The current study examines associations between self- and friend-reports of internalizing and externalizing adjustment in a community sample of fifth-, eighth-, and eleventh-grade youth.…
Descriptors: Prevention, Friendship, Adolescents, Behavior Problems
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Rose, Amanda J.; Swenson, Lance P. – Developmental Psychology, 2009
Aggression is associated with a host of behavioral, social, and emotional adjustment difficulties. However, some aggressive youth are perceived as "popular" by peers. Although these perceived popular aggressive youth appear relatively well adjusted, especially in the social domain, the emotional well-being of these youth is understudied. The…
Descriptors: Aggression, Adolescents, Emotional Adjustment, Peer Acceptance
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Smith, Rhiannon L.; Rose, Amanda J.; Schwartz-Mette, Rebecca A. – Social Development, 2010
Research on relational aggression has drawn attention to how girls may be likely to aggress, but the role of gender is not fully understood. There are opposing views regarding whether relational aggression is most common among girls. Current findings demonstrate that when gender differences in relational aggression are assessed with peer…
Descriptors: Aggression, Females, Peer Acceptance, Gender Differences
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Rose, Amanda J.; Swenson, Lance P.; Robert, Christopher – International Journal of Behavioral Development, 2009
Girls' and boys' peer relationships are thought to have unique strengths and weaknesses. However, developmentalists have done a better job of identifying strengths of girls' friendships than boys' friendships. The present research was aimed at better understanding boys' friendship strengths. The study focused on the frequency with which youth (N =…
Descriptors: Males, Friendship, Gender Differences, Females
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Rose, Amanda J.; Rudolph, Karen D. – Psychological Bulletin, 2006
Theory and research on sex differences in adjustment focus largely on parental, societal, and biological influences. However, it also is important to consider how peers contribute to girls' and boys' development. This article provides a critical review of sex differences in several peer relationship processes, including behavioral and…
Descriptors: Peer Relationship, Gender Differences, Emotional Development, Behavior Development
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Rose, Amanda J.; Carlson, Wendy; Waller, Erika M. – Developmental Psychology, 2007
Co-ruminating, or excessively discussing problems, with friends is proposed to have adjustment tradeoffs. Co-rumination is hypothesized to contribute both to positive friendship adjustment and to problematic emotional adjustment. Previous single-assessment research was consistent with this hypothesis, but whether co-rumination is an antecedent…
Descriptors: Longitudinal Studies, Children, Adolescents, Females
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Rose, Amanda J. – Child Development, 2002
This questionnaire study examined co-rumination (extensive discussion of problems, focusing on negative feelings) among third-, fifth-, seventh-, and ninth-graders and its relationship to positive friendship adjustment and problematic emotional adjustment. Responses indicated that co-rumination related to high-quality close friendships but also to…
Descriptors: Anxiety, Children, Cross Sectional Studies, Depression (Psychology)
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Rose, Amanda J.; Carlson, Wendy; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Schwartz-Mette, Rebecca A.; Smith, Rhiannon R.; Swenson, Lance P. – Merrill-Palmer Quarterly: Journal of Developmental Psychology, 2011
Youth's friendships serve important functions in development; however, internalizing symptoms may undermine these relationships. Two studies are presented that examine the association of depressive and anxiety symptoms with friendship adjustment. Study 1 tested concurrent effects and Study 2 tested prospective effects over 6 months. Like past…
Descriptors: Friendship, Depression (Psychology), Anxiety, Individual Development
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Rose, Amanda J.; Asher, Steven R. – Child Development, 2004
The present research tested whether children's responses to help-giving and help-seeking friendship tasks predicted how many friends they had and the quality of their best friendship. Fifth-grade children (N=511; typically 10 or 11 years old) responded to vignettes in which they could either give help to a friend or seek help from a friend.…
Descriptors: Grade 5, Gender Differences, Friendship
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Rose, Amanda J.; Schwartz-Mette, Rebecca A.; Smith, Rhiannon L.; Asher, Steven R.; Swenson, Lance P.; Carlson, Wendy; Waller, Erika M. – Child Development, 2012
Although girls disclose to friends about problems more than boys, little is known about processes underlying this sex difference. Four studies (Ns = 526, 567, 769, 154) tested whether middle childhood to mid-adolescent girls and boys (ranging from 8 to 17 years old) differ in how they expect that talking about problems would make them feel. Girls…
Descriptors: Gender Differences, Disclosure, Friendship, Children
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