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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: EJ966627
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 8
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1750-9467
Relationship between the Social Functioning of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Their Siblings' Competencies/Problem Behaviors
Brewton, Christie M.; Nowell, Kerri P.; Lasala, Morgan W.; Goin-Kochel, Robin P.
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, v6 n2 p646-653 Apr-Jun 2012
There is very little known about how sibling characteristics may influence the social functioning of a child with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current study utilized data from the Simons Simplex Collection (SSC; n=1355 children with ASD and 1351 siblings) to investigate this relationship. Phenotypic measures included (a) the "Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised" (ADI-R), the "Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule" (ADOS), and the "Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II" (VABS-II) for the probands with ASD and (b) the "Social Communication Questionnaire" (SCQ), the "Social Responsiveness Scale" (SRS), the "Child Behavior Checklist" (CBCL), and the VABS-II for siblings. Sibling data were first analyzed collectively, then analyzed by "older" and "younger" groups, relative to the age of the proband with ASD. Significant correlations were observed between probands' and siblings' VABS-II socialization domain scores; additional associations were noted between (a) probands' VABS-II socialization domain scores and siblings' CBCL internalizing subscale scores when only younger siblings were analyzed, and (b) probands' ADOS Reciprocal Social Interaction (RSI) domain scores and the sibling SCQ scores when only older siblings were analyzed. These findings suggest that typically developing children may have a small yet meaningful influence on the prosocial development of their siblings with ASD. Limitations and future directions are discussed. (Contains 4 tables.)
Elsevier. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. Tel: 877-839-7126; Tel: 407-345-4020; Fax: 407-363-1354; e-mail: usjcs@elsevier.com; Web site: http://www.elsevier.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule; Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales; Child Behavior Checklist