NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
The Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) is celebrating its 50th Birthday! First opened on May 15th, 1964 ERIC continues the long tradition of ongoing innovation and enhancement.

Learn more about the history of ERIC here. PDF icon

Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ954271
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Mar
Pages: 18
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0898-5898
The Use of Cohesive Devices in Argumentative Writing by Chinese EFL Learners at Different Proficiency Levels
Yang, Wenxing; Sun, Ying
Linguistics and Education: An International Research Journal, v23 n1 p31-48 Mar 2012
This article reports on a study that comparatively investigated the differences and similarities in the (incorrect) use of cohesive devices by second-year and fourth-year undergraduate Chinese EFL learners in their argumentative writings. Via detailed analysis of the quantitative and qualitative data, this study seeks to reveal if the patterns of variation in participants' (incorrect) employment of cohesive items may help portray whether and how EFL learners of higher proficiency develop their written discourse competence as compared with the lower proficiency counterparts, and to what degree the (correct) use of cohesive devices indicates their writing quality. Results show that EFL learners at different proficiency levels significantly diverged from each other in their (incorrect) adoption of some cohesive items. In the main, higher proficiency EFL learners' overall ability to apprehend and manipulate cohesive devices has indeed strengthened, which to some extent reflects the gradual maturation of their written discourse competence. Meanwhile, it merits heed that the upward trend may not be in an absolutely all-round fashion. Results also demonstrate that the (correct) use of cohesive devices correlated significantly positively with the writing quality, irrespective of the EFL proficiency levels. These findings hold some implications for ESL/EFL writing theory and pedagogy. (Contains 14 tables.)
Elsevier. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. Tel: 877-839-7126; Tel: 407-345-4020; Fax: 407-363-1354; e-mail: usjcs@elsevier.com; Web site: http://www.elsevier.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A