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ERIC Number: EJ895665
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 13
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 34
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1436-4522
Developing Simulation-Based Computer Assisted Learning to Correct Students' Statistical Misconceptions Based on Cognitive Conflict Theory, Using "Correlation" as an Example
Liu, Tzu-Chien
Educational Technology & Society, v13 n2 p180-192 2010
Understanding and applying statistical concepts is essential in modern life. However, common statistical misconceptions limit the ability of students to understand statistical concepts. Although simulation-based computer assisted learning (CAL) is promising for use in students learning statistics, substantial improvement is still needed. For example, few simulation-based CALs have been developed to address statistical misconceptions, most of the studies about simulation-based CAL for statistics learning lacked theoretical backgrounds, and design principles for enhancing the effectiveness of dynamically linked multiple representations (DLMRs), which is the main mechanism of simulation-based CAL, are needed. Therefore, this work develops a simulation-based CAL prototype, Simulation Assisted Learning Statistics (SALS), to correct misconceptions about the statistical concept of correlation. The proposed SALS has two novel elements. One is the use of the design principles based on cognitive load and the other is application of the learning model based on cognitive conflict theory. Further, a formative evaluation is conducted by using a case study to explore the effects and limitations of SALS. Evaluation results indicate that despite the need for further improvement, SALS is effective for correcting statistical misconceptions. Finally, recommendations for future research are proposed. (Contains 1 table and 5 figures.)
International Forum of Educational Technology & Society. Athabasca University, School of Computing & Information Systems, 1 University Drive, Athabasca, AB T9S 3A3, Canada. Tel: 780-675-6812; Fax: 780-675-6973; Web site: http://www.ifets.info
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A