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50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: EJ784293
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2007
Pages: 28
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0161-6463
Selling Indian Education: Fundraising and American Indian Identities at Bacone College, 1880-1941
Neuman, Lisa K.
American Indian Culture and Research Journal, v31 n4 p51-78 2007
Historically, American Indian education in the United States was inextricably linked to Euro-American colonialism. By the late nineteenth century, many Euro-Americans thought Native Americans were a "vanishing race," and schools for Indians incorporated this belief into their design. In the United States, the large number and variety of schools for Indians that sprang up from the late nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries were intended as a means to assimilate Native communities into the American mainstream, turn "primitive" peoples into "civilized" individuals, and create Christian citizens who would adopt the values of private property, hard work, and industry considered important by many Euro-Americans. This article focuses on Bacone College, a small American Baptist school for Indians founded in 1880 in what is now Oklahoma, and presents a brief history of Bacone College: its mission, students, curriculum, and early attempts at fundraising. The author explores the unique social and legal forces that shaped Bacone College from 1880 to 1941 and demonstrates how and why Bacone's fundraising efforts shifted dramatically during the 1920s toward an emphasis on the Indian identities of its students. She also shows how successful fundraising led to the creation of new campus programs that emphasize American Indian cultures and identities, and briefly discusses the positive effects of these programs on Indian students. (Contains 130 notes.)
American Indian Studies Center at UCLA. 3220 Campbell Hall, Box 951548, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1548. Tel: 310-825-7315; Fax: 310-206-7060; e-mail: sales@aisc.ucla.edu; Web site: http://www.books.aisc.ucla.edu/aicrj.html
Publication Type: Historical Materials; Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education; Two Year Colleges
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Oklahoma