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50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: EJ721791
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2006-Mar
Pages: 14
Abstractor: Author
Reference Count: 27
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0305-5698
University Students' Self-Efficacy and Their Attitudes Toward the Internet: The Role of Students' Perceptions of the Internet
Peng, Hsinyi; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Wu, Ying-Tien
Educational Studies, v32 n1 p73-86 Mar 2006
The attitudes and the self-efficacy that characterize learners relative to the Internet have been identified as important factors that affect learners' motivation, interests and performance in Internet-based learning environments. Meanwhile, learners' perceptions of the Internet may shape learners' attitudes and online behaviours. This study investigates university students' attitudes and self-efficacy towards the Internet, and explores the role that university students' perceptions of the Internet may play in their Internet attitudes and self-efficacy. The results indicate that university students demonstrate positive attitudes and adequate Internet self-efficacy and that these students are more inclined to view the Internet as a functional tool--a functional technology. Gender differences exist in university students' attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the Internet; that is, male students demonstrate Internet attitudes that are more positive than those of their female peers. Furthermore, students who perceive the Internet as a leisure tool (e.g. as a tour or a toy) show more positive attitudes and communicative self-efficacy than students who use the Internet as a functional technology. Educators and researchers need to be aware of these differences and to take them into consideration in their instruction. Lastly, this study serves as a starting-point for research that more broadly explores learners' perceptions of the Internet.
Customer Services for Taylor & Francis Group Journals, 325 Chestnut Street, Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420 (Toll Free); Fax: 215-625-8914.
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Taiwan