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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: EJ683486
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2004-Mar
Pages: 14
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 9
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0145-482X
Use of a Structured Observation to Evaluate Visual Behavior in Young Children: Research Report
Rydberg, Agneta; Ericson, Birgit; Lindstedt, Eva
Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, v98 n3 p1-14 Mar 2004
When assessing the visual function of young children, it is important to use a variety of tests. It is essential to have a structured observation method when it is not possible to use ordinary acuity tests. A structured observation method can be created by using a checklist. An ideal checklist should be handy and reliable and include a minimum of observations. The checklist should give relevant information about visual function and help identify children with visual impairments. A checklist of this type was constructed by one of the authors (Lindstedt, 1994, 1997) for controlled observation of visual behavior. This checklist has been used for more than 20 years and has proved valuable, particularly for assessing young visually impaired children with or without additional impairments. The participants in the study reported here were sighted children and children with visual impairments that were due to ocular disease but who had no other impairments. The results of appraising vision by use of the checklist were compared with the results of the evaluations with other vision tests: (1) grating acuity and contrast-detection ability, for which tests can be used with children aged 2 and younger, and (2) optotype acuity tests for distance, which is the measure used by the World Health Organization for classifying visual impairment. The aim of the comparison was to determine whether the result obtained by the checklist placed a child in the correct "level of vision" that corresponded to that obtained with other tests and at what age it is possible to use the checklist. Some preliminary results from this study were reported previously (Ericson, Rydberg, & Lindstedt, 1998).
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Early Childhood Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A