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ERIC Number: ED493422
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2006-Apr
Pages: 17
Abstractor: ERiC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Answering the Challenge of a Changing World: Strengthening Education for the 21st Century
US Department of Education
To Americans, innovation means much more than the latest gadget. It means creating a more productive, prosperous, mobile and healthy society. Innovation fuels this way of life and improves quality of life. Its wellspring is education. President Bush has made innovation and education top priorities. He worked with Congress to pass the most far-reaching education reform in decades, the "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB)." The law has brought high standards and accountability to public schools and sparked a mathematics and reading revival in the early grades. The president has also increased funding for innovative and intensive reading programs such as Reading First by more than 200 percent since 2001, benefiting more than a million students. The rest of the world, meanwhile, has not stood still. America no longer holds the sole patent on innovation. Inspired by our example, countries such as China, India and South Korea have invested heavily in education, technology and R & D. Billions of new competitors are challenging America's economic leadership. Educational leadership has been challenged as well, with students from many developed nations outperforming ours in international tests, particularly in math and science. These test scores are linked to a lack of challenging course work, an ominous sign for many American schools. The impact may be felt well into the future: According to some estimates, America's share of the world's science and engineering doctorates is predicted to fall to 15 percent by 2010. This global challenge calls for bold action and leadership. Schools must help students develop the skills they will need to compete and succeed in higher education and the workforce, which are increasingly connected in this changed world. They must develop a pool of technically adept and numerically literate Americans to ensure a continual supply of highly trained mathematicians, scientists and engineers. (Contains 5 endnotes.)
ED Pubs. P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877-433-7827; Fax: 301-470-1244; Web site: http://www.ed.gov/about/pubs/intro/index.html?src=gu.
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of the Secretary.
Identifiers: No Child Left Behind Act 2001