Notes FAQ Contact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED450349
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 2000-Jul
Pages: 42
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Comparison Study of the Traditional Reading Strategy of Reading Aloud with an Adult and the Technology Based Strategy of Computerized Talking Books.
Humble, Amy Leah
This research project investigated whether computer-enhanced reading improved the reading fluency of students. This study looked at 22 second grade students, ages seven and eight, from an elementary school located in a suburban community. The class was divided randomly into two equal groups. The researcher introduced all students to the book at the same time. The book was read aloud to the entire class and then each student read the book silently. An Informal Reading Inventory (IRI) was then administered to each student using text taken from the book title being used. After this initial introduction, one group read from the hardcopy of the book while the second group used the Living Books CD for the same title. The group using the hardcopy of the book read their book aloud to an adult. The group using the Living Books CD read along silently as the computer read the text to the student. The researcher then took one week to administer a second IRI to each student using the same text that was used in the initial IRI. The groups alternated for the second book title so that all students in the class had the opportunity to use both the written text and the Living Books CD. This study shows that when the students used the Living Books software their IRI scores were almost equal to the IRI scores of reading aloud to an adult. This indicates that when a classroom teacher does not have the extra set of hands of an aide or parent volunteer, she can use the computer to aid in reading practice. (Contains 21 references, and a figure and a table of data. Appendixes contain the letter to parents, permission forms, a list of books used, and the text of the books used.) (RS)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Master of Arts Action Research Project, Johnson Bi